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One year after reforms, Indian farmers continue protest movement

By France24
03 October 2021   |   6:33 am
One year ago, India's parliament passed a series of laws aimed at reforming the country's agricultural system. The move was supposed to allow farmers, especially those cultivating wheat and rice, to sell their products to private companies without going through local markets. But what was meant to be a revolution for Prime Minister Narendra Modi has turned into the longest and biggest peasant protest since the country's independence nearly 75 years ago.

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