Monday, 16th May 2022
<To guardian.ng
Search

Birth control in India: Women take charge of their future

By France24
05 February 2022   |   10:20 am
With a population of 1.4 billion people, many would find it hard to believe that India has a fertility problem. However, according to a new country-wide study, the fertility rate in the country has fallen below the replacement rate, and India's demography could stabilise. This will also mean better opportunities for Indian women who are now carrying the whole responsibility of birth control. For many women, sterilisation is preferred to regular contraception. A report by Anida Saifi and Thomas Denis.

Related

1 Jan
Children have been out of school for over a year, raising worries about students falling behind. In India this month, some states have started allowing schools to reopen. But in Delhi, many are choosing to stay away, over fears of a third wave.
3 Jan
Initial restrictions imposed by the Taliban after their takeover mostly targeted urban women. Now, the expanded rules could affect all women in Afghanistan.
7 Jan
Some 100,000 abortions take place every year in Spain. In theory, terminations are a right under Spanish law but in practice, many women face obstacles when they choose to terminate a pregnancy. The medical establishment itself is often hostile to the prospect of performing abortions, and doctors working in the field say they are stigmatised by their pro-life colleagues. Our correspondents report.
7 Jan
In an effort to stave off a spike in COVID-19 infections, authorities have started to impose strict rules. With most new cases reported in urban areas, nighttime curfews have been declared in all major cities. But maintaining social distancing is a huge challenge.
10 Jan
A new women's football league is all set to launch on Monday (November 22) across Saudi Arabia. Sixteen teams will take part in the league.
14 Jan
FRANCE 24 spoke to Mahbouba Seraj, a leading women's rights activist in Afghanistan. She told us the Taliban have to "give in" on "red lines" such as women's access to education and work in order to "continue governing". With Afghanistan in dire need of financial assistance, Seraj said she was "angry at the whole world", especially US President Joe Biden. "You cannot let the people of this country die," she said in an emotional plea to the international community.
14 Jan
Indian authorities have ordered an investigation into a deadly train accident in eastern India where 12 rail cars derailed. The express train had more than 1,000 people on board.
15 Jan
Rice is a major priority crop in West Africa. Nearly 16 million tons are consumed annually. The region wants to become independent of rice imports, but many farmers lack the right tools to achieve that goal.
17 Jan
Hundreds of thousands of devotees have congregated on the banks of the Ganges to mark Makar Sankranti, amid soaring COVID-19 infections.
18 Jan
Climate Minister Robert Habeck wants to make Germany climate-neutral by 2045. The southern city of Freiburg is already close to achieving his vision.
18 Jan
The birth rate in the world's most populous country, China, has fallen for a fifth consecutive year to hit a record low. The population is ageing and the workforce is shrinking. Despite ending the decades-long one-child policy, the baby boom officials had hoped for never materialised. These rapidly changing demographics foreshadow a crisis that could undercut the country's economic and social stability.
20 Jan
The world is entering a new era of warfare, with cyber and autonomous weapons taking center stage. These technologies are making militaries faster, smarter, more efficient.