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In Africa’s fashion capital, Lagos, ‘trad is swag’

By Abiodun Ogundairo
14 June 2017   |   5:17 am
In Nigeria, traditional robes, collarless shirts and long tunics used to be seen as clothing for the old. But in recent years, traditional clothing -- or "trad" as it's been dubbed -- is a regular sight at business meetings, weddings and nightclubs as men's fashion goes back to its roots.

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