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Australia postpones Afghanistan match over Taliban attitude to women’s sport

By Reuters
05 November 2021   |   12:49 pm
Cricket Australia (CA) confirmed on Friday (November 5) it has postponed the Afghanistan test in Hobart scheduled for Nov. 27 until the situation regarding the women's game in the South Asian nation becomes clearer. CA had said in September it would scrap the test if the Taliban government, which took power in August, did not allow women and girls to play the sport.

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