Tuesday, 9th August 2022
<To guardian.ng
Search

Tunisian satellite launches into space

By France24
27 March 2021   |   1:28 pm
In tonight's edition: The main opposition challenger in Congo Brazzaville's elections dies of Covid-19 on polling day. Guy-Brice Parfait Kolelas' death overshadows the weekend's vote, which is expected to return incumbent President Denis Sassou Nguesso to power. Also, in Kenya, Lamu's fishermen protest over a border dispute with Somalia. And Tunisia has an out of this world day by launching its first satellite, named "Challenge One".

Related

14 Oct 2021
Star Trek actor William Shatner and his crewmates -- Chris Boshuizen, Audrey Powers, and Glen de Vries -- train ahead of their trip to the edge of space.
19 Oct 2021
Former Ivory Coast President Laurent Gbagbo vowed on Sunday (October 17) to continue in politics "until my death" as he launched a new party following his acquittal by the International Criminal Court and return from a decade abroad. Gbagbo, president from 2000-2011, returned to Ivory Coast in June after being acquitted in 2019 by the Netherlands-based court on war crimes charges for his role in a civil war sparked by his refusal to concede defeat in an election.
19 Oct 2021
A Russian film crew has landed on Earth after filming scenes for the world's first feature movie shot in space.
21 Oct 2021
South Korea has launched its first domestically developed space rocket but failed to put its dummy payload into orbit, a setback in the country's attempts to join the ranks of advanced space-faring nations.
23 Oct 2021
Amid projections that a staggering 97 percent of Afghan households could fall below the poverty line by the middle of next year, the United Nations Development Programme has launched a $670 million trust fund to provide economic relief. Also, Evergrande makes a key debt payment and shares for Snapchat's parent company plunge as the application faces tighter privacy restrictions on iPhones.
25 Oct 2021
Here are a few reasons to pick up a copy of The Guardian on Tuesday. Find these stories and much more when you grab a copy of The Guardian on Tuesday.⁣⁣⁣
29 Oct 2021
Tunisia's independent media regulator shuttered Nessma TV, owned by President Kais Saied's political rival. Quran Kareem, a religious radio station, was also closed.
3 Nov 2021
We look at reactions to several key elections in the US. Papers in the UK and France report on the situation for migrants in Calais, five years after the dismantling of the "Jungle" migrant camp. As Madagascar faces the world's first famine caused by climate change, billionaire Elon Musk challenges the World Food Programme. We also explain why women should stop working for the rest of the year, while Norway's women's beach handball team finally gets to wear shorts!
6 Nov 2021
Tunisia’s lagoon farmers north of Tunis face the real-world impacts of climate change as rising sea levels, hotter weather and scant rainfall threaten to wipe out crop – and an agricultural system dating back to the 17th century.
9 Nov 2021
It's an immense moment of pride for the whole team as French astronaut Thomas Pesquet and his crewmates return to Earth. The four astronauts splashed down successfully off the coast of Florida in a SpaceX capsule. It marks the end of Pesquet's six-month mission in space, where he became the first ever French astronaut to command the International Space Station. We spoke to his colleague and friend Rémi Canton, who led the mission for the CNES, the French space studies agency.
15 Nov 2021
Protesters gathered at the Agareb landfill to protest its reopening on Wednesday, a day after a demonstrator died from allegedly inhaling tear gas fired by police at a similar rally. "It is not reasonable for the army to protect a place of waste and to fire tear gas and attack the protesters," said a protester. Tunisia’s General Trade Union (UGTT) called for a general strike and a day of mourning in Agareb following the death of the 35-year-old protester.  
16 Nov 2021
Russia has acknowledged destroying a satellite in a missile test, as the US had reported. But the Kremlin denies creating a risk to others in space — and says the US is being hypocritical on space safety.