Sunday, 3rd July 2022
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Women in Afghanistan: Meeting those determined to resist

Despite the threat of violence, we meet those determined to protest for women's rights as the Taliban consolidates its control of the country. Also the Mexican Supreme Court rules that criminalisation of abortion is unconstitutional, paving the way for legalisation. Plus the activists in Togo who are fighting against online harassment of women. This as some 45 percent of women in West Africa are said to be victims of cyber-bullying.

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15 May
We look at reactions to Finland and Sweden's imminent bid to join NATO. Spanish lawmakers will soon discuss a proposal to offer period pain leave to women, which, if passed, would make Spain the first Western nation to do so. Also, the US wins hosting rights to the Rugby World Cups in 2031 and 2033. We then look at Friday the 13th and why there's even a word for people who fear the day. Finally, Indian parents sue their son... for not giving them grandchildren!
15 May
The "Maghreb-Orient des livres" book festival takes place in Paris this weekend, focusing on literature from north Africa and the Middle East. One of those taking part is Jérémie Dres, the author of the graphic novel "The day I met bin Laden". It features the story of two young French men who travelled from France to Afghanistan in the spring of 2001, just months before the 9/11 terror attacks. The pair then found themselves trapped in Afghanistan and were later sent to the Guantanamo Bay detention camp. The author joined us for Perspective to tell us more.
19 May
Bombs and weapons used in Afghanistan by militants and US forces are making their way into India-administered Kashmir, raising fears that they could bolster an Islamist insurgency in the area.
21 May
An entrepreneurship association made up mostly of young women from South Kivu in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, is manufacturing soap from coffee beans. The group’s coordinator, Mademoiselle Solange Kwinja, says the product is a great success since it is now being marketed in Bukavu, the provincial capital.
23 May
The Taliban has made face veils mandatory for all Afghan women appearing in public, including those on television. This edict was ignored by presenters on Saturday, but they relented a day later.
25 May
Since the Taliban returned to power in Afghanistan last year, international aid for the country has dried up. The pandemic and the ongoing food crisis have complicated an already dire economic situation. Unicef says that as more families are pushed deeper into poverty, they are forced to make desperate choices, such as putting children to work and marrying girls off at a young age. Our France 2 colleagues report.
5 Jun
Many women in Angola’s province of Bengo are now achieving places often occupied by men. For example: arbitration. Young female referees show the importance of cooperating with each other – no matter who, no matter where.
30 May
Many women in Angola’s province of Bengo are now achieving places often occupied by men. For example: arbitration. Young female referees show the importance of cooperating with each other – no matter who, no matter where.
11 Jun
Kabare prison is notorious for deaths in custody caused by hunger. Now, women are changing it with a food project.
4 Jun
Afghanistan is heading back to the pre-2001 dark days of the Taliban, and Western powers were naive if they ever thought this wouldn't be the case. That's the view of Heather Barr, associate women's rights director at Human Rights Watch. As women are told to cover their faces in public again and female television presenters are told to do the same, she spoke to us on Perspective about the how the Taliban are rolling back women's rights and what, if anything, the West can do about it. "Life has become a prison for most women and girls," she told us.
13 Jun
In what is set to be a landmark agreement for gender equality, the EU is to vote on legislation where companies will face mandatory quotas to ensure women have at least 40 percent of seats on corporate boards. Annette Young talks to Carlien Scheele from the European Institute for Gender Studies on what it means for businesses across the European bloc. Also as the Taliban continues to ban schooling for girls aged over 11, we meet the Afghan people risking all to ensure girls receive an education. Plus the story of Viola Smith, the first female professional jazz drummer who fought for greater recognition of women in the industry.
18 Jun
According to the United Nations, some 23 million people are suffering from acute hunger n Afghanistan, including 10 million children who urgently need help in order to survive. Since the start of the year, humanitarian organisations have been able to help 8.2 million people by providing food assistance, including emergency food rations and supplements for breastfeeding mothers and their infants. But this aid is dwindling fast and the situation, which has continually worsened since the Taliban returned to power in August 2021, is reaching a critical stage. Our team reports from Herat, in north-western Afghanistan.