Tuesday, 27th September 2022
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WHO: Global vaccine inequity, “not only immoral” but “stupid”

At a World Health Organization press briefing on the Covid-19 pandemic, United Nations Secretary-General, Antonio Guterres, argues that maintaining unequal access to vaccines between rich and poor countries is not only "immoral" but also "stupid" because it risks allowing the rise of variants resistant to current vaccines.

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