Thursday, 26th January 2023
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Taliban fighters hit a Kabul fairground as Afghans fear for freedoms

Taliban fighters laugh and whoop onboard a pirate ship ride at an amusement park in the west of Afghanistan's capital Kabul. An incongruous scene, and one that might have been unimaginable during the group's brutally oppressive reign in the 1990s. But while the Islamist hardliners have promised a more moderate rule this time, many Afghans have already seen their freedoms curbed.

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16 Oct 2021
Every weekend, fighters from around Afghanistan gather on a public field in the capital to pit their skills against each other in a sport that is a mix of judo and wrestling.
10 Oct 2021
Traders of carpets, antiques and souvenirs on Kabul's famed Chicken Street say business has completely dried up since the vast majority of foreigners left the Afghan capital as the Taliban took over.
5 Oct 2021
Taliban supporters and senior figures hold their first mass rally outside Kabul, in a show of strength as they consolidate their rule of Afghanistan. No foreign government has yet recognised the Islamist former rebels' rule, but their hold on power within the country is all but unchallenged seven weeks after they took the capital. The official victory gathering in Kohdaman township, in the hilly outskirts of the capital, was attended by 1,500 men and boys.
5 Oct 2021
Marines from the battalion that suffered ten casualties - nine marines and one sailor - in the August 26 Kabul airport terrorist attack return to their home base of Camp Pendleton, California.
12 Oct 2021
Elated Sydneysiders defied grey skies and drizzle to celebrate the end of almost four months of lockdown in Australia's largest city, with many embracing a return to cafes and hairdressers. Sydney's more than five million residents have been subjected to a 106-day lockdown, designed to limit the march of the highly transmissible Delta variant.
20 Oct 2021
Hundreds of drug users shelter in squalid conditions under a bridge in western Kabul synonymous with hard drugs and violent crime - and since the Taliban came to power, raids on areas where addicts gather have become more frequent. With poppies cheap and easy to grow, Afghanistan provides around 90 percent of the world's production of heroin, but since retaking power the Taliban have pledged to ban narcotics production.
1 Nov 2021
Before the Taliban swept to power in Afghanistan, Kabul was a city with a vibrant nightlife and arts scene. But since then, there has been a radical transformation. Thousands of longtime Taliban fighters have poured into the capital, now working in round-the-clock security patrols. Meanwhile, financial disputes and quarrels between neighbours are being settled by Islamic judges. FRANCE 24's Catherine Norris-Trent and Roméo Langlois report from Kabul.
9 Nov 2021
In Kabul's main children's hospital, the crumbling of Afghanistan's health system can be seen in the eyes of the exhausted staff who have remained in the city, ekeing out their fast-diminishing stocks of medicines. As crowds of mothers and sick and malnourished children fill the waiting rooms of the Indira Gandhi Children's Hospital, medical staff are squeezing three babies into a single incubator and doubling up in infant warmer beds. Nurses who once took care of three or four babies each, are now having to look after 20 or more to make up for the absence of staff who fled the country when the Taliban seized power in August.
30 Oct 2021
After taking power in August, the Taliban now need to put in place a functioning state in Afghanistan. Official declarations and policies are scarce for now, but no doubt the most tangible sign of the Taliban takeover are the security patrols of thousands of former fighters who have poured into the capital. They're now police officers who are enforcing a strict interpretation of Sharia law. Our reporters Catherine Norris-Trent and Roméo Langlois were able to follow Taliban fighters on patrol in Kabul and also gain access to a hearing of an Islamic court.
4 Nov 2021
Local traders and residents reacted to the Taliban ban of foreign currencies for trade, at the Sarai Shahzada market in Kabul on Wednesday after the Taliban made the announcement on Tuesday. The US dollar has been used widely in Afghanistan’s markets before the ban.
13 Nov 2021
Almost three months after the Taliban swept to power in Afghanistan, the country's economy is imploding. Many NGOs and foreign companies have left, leaving thousands of Afghans suddenly unemployed. Some $9.5 billion of assets have been frozen abroad and banks are running out of money. The value of the local currency is plummeting and food prices have soared. This dire situation is pushing thousands of Afghans to flee the country. FRANCE 24's Catherine Norris-Trent and Roméo Langlois report.
17 Nov 2021
Since the Taliban returned to power in August, life in Afghanistan has become more and more difficult. The country, which was already beset by an economic crisis, is now confronted with a worsening humanitarian catastrophe. Billions of dollars in aid money have dried up, funding for hospitals is non-existent and nearly half the population faces acute hunger. Our team on the ground reports.