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Secularism in Canada: Controversy after Quebec teacher fired for wearing hijab

By France24
16 February 2022   |   4:09 pm
Back in June 2019, the provincial government in Quebec adopted a secularism law, known as Bill 21. The law bars some government employees in positions of authority, such as teachers, from wearing religious signs while on the job. In December 2021, the law was applied for the first time. A Muslim teacher who wears a hijab was removed from her job and reassigned to an administrative position. The decision has sparked controversy and polarised Canadians.

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