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Over 100 Taliban soldiers graduate from military training in Khost, Afghanistan

By Reuters
13 January 2022   |   3:14 pm
A total of 150 Taliban soldiers on Thursday graduated from the first brigade of the 203rd Mansoori Corps in the southeastern zone after three months of training in the southeastern Khost province. Officials at the brigade say the graduates are well-trained and will strongly defend Afghanistan.

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