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Macron the mediator: Can France help calm Ukraine crisis?

By France24
12 February 2022   |   11:16 am
Emmanuel Macron is on a special trip to Moscow to meet and talk with Vladimir Putin. The mission: to try and calm matters on the Ukraine-Russia border and avoid what many analysts say is certain war. Macron is representing the EU, with France holding the rotating presidency. What influence does he take into these talks?

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