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Coronavirus digest: SA scientists monitor new, rare COVID-19 variant

By DW
05 September 2021   |   8:06 am
Experts in South Africa are testing a new coronavirus variant to determine if it poses a threat. Germany's infection rate has fallen for the first time since early July.

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