Monday, 23rd May 2022
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Climate change: Oceans hotter than ever before, new study reveals

Ocean waters hit their highest temperature ever last year, and the rate at which they are warming is speeding up, a new study has revealed. Researchers called the new data "further proof of global warming."

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