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As Western firms cut ties with Russia, Kremlin signals it could seize assets

By France24
13 March 2022   |   3:55 pm
The growing exodus of Western firms has upset Russian consumers, while authorities are weighing up the possibility of temporarily taking over firms with large shares of foreign ownership. We take a closer look. Also, the IMF warns that rising commodity prices due to the war in Ukraine could hurt developing nations in particular, and investors grapple with market volatility.

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