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2020 weather disasters boosted by climate change: report

By Abiodun Ogundairo
03 January 2021   |   7:00 am
The ten costliest weather disasters worldwide this year saw insured damages worth $150 billion, according to a report published on Monday. The same disasters claimed at least 3,500 lives and displaced more than 13.5 million people. From Australia's out-of-control wildfires in January to a record number of Atlantic hurricanes through November, the true cost of the year's climate-enhanced calamities was in fact far higher because most losses were uninsured.

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