Thursday, 8th June 2023
<To guardian.ng
Search

Polluted by the oil industry: Life in Nigeria’s Ogoniland

By France24
03 July 2021   |   6:21 am
The Ogoniland area of southern Nigeria is one of the most polluted places on Earth. The crops are burnt to a cinder, ash and tar smother the land and the wells are polluted with oil, making the water totally undrinkable. Entire communities have suffered as their way of life has been destroyed by the oil industry. Our reporters take you to Ogoniland, in the Niger Delta, where pollution has become the norm.

Related

24 Mar
Thousands of people in Nigeria's Niger Delta region are suing oil giant Royal Dutch Shell over alleged damage to their communities. They hope to convince a British court that Shell's exploration activities have polluted their rivers and water supplies.
27 Mar
Myanmar's largest city has been cut off from the world for almost four years. DW spoke with Yangon residents about what life is like under a military regime.
27 Mar
The Super Eagles were defeated by Guinea Bissau 0-1 when both sides last met last week. Can they do it again? Host Ayomide Sotubo talks about the last game and the coming game in this episode of The Nutmeg.
28 Mar
The Super Eagles fulfilled their promise of revenge against Guinea-Bissau and we will be reviewing the game for you. Ayomide Sotubo dissects what we learned from the two fixtures on this episode of The Nutmeg.
28 Mar
Find these stories and much more when you grab a copy of The Guardian on Wednesday.⁣
29 Mar
Prof. Micheal Nwankpa, Founding Director and Director of the Research Centre for African Conflict and Development, London launched his much-anticipated book Nigeria’s Fourth Republic, 1999-2021: A Militarised Democracy at the University of Lagos recently.
29 Mar
A life-sized statue of Lionel Messi was presented to the soccer player for his historic display during the 2022 World Cup. Messi was emotional at the time, taking to Instagram to say, “that was a beautiful moment, very special and emotional.” The statue will sit in a museum alongside similar sculptures of Pele and Diego Maradona.
31 Mar
What did Beethoven die of? What hereditary diseases did he carry? Beethoven's hair reveals a lot, but by no means everything. One lock that was supposed to be his was actually from a woman.
8 Apr
As an Israeli intelligence agent in the 1990s, Mishka Ben-David was entrusted with high-stakes espionage missions across the Middle East. Now a successful author, he's channelled that experience into his latest thriller, "Duet in Beirut".
8 Apr
A right to die with dignity, or a slippery slope to legalised murder? Debates over assisted dying have been going on in Europe for a long time, but they seem to have intensified, with France, Belgium, Portugal and Ireland all recently re-considering their legislation, or at least launching consultations on the subject. A right to die with dignity, or a slippery slope to legalised murder? Debates over assisted dying have been going on in Europe for a long time, but they seem to have intensified, with France, Belgium, Portugal and Ireland all recently re-considering their legislation, or at least launching consultations on the subject.
8 Apr
They may rule the online universe, but how are influencers being regulated in the real world? And what's next for their business models? Kate Moody talks to Quentin Bordage, Founder and CEO of Kolsquare, an influencer marketing platform in France.
3 Apr
The oil production cuts will total more than a million barrels per day — the biggest reduction since OPEC slashed two million barrels a day in October.