Wednesday, 19th January 2022
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Growing crops without soil in Burkina Faso

Farming using hydroponics is becoming increasingly popular throughout Africa. The method saves on water and soil by instead using organic materials like coconut fiber or clay balls to grow crops.

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Farming using hydroponics is becoming increasingly popular throughout Africa. The method saves on water and soil by instead using organic materials like coconut fiber or clay balls to grow crops.