Friday, 7th October 2022
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Thousands of South Sudanese refugees seek shelter in Uganda

Over one and a half million South Sudanese have fled the war and famine in their country. An estimated 800,000 of them have escaped to neighbouring Uganda and more than 2,000 are still crossing the border every day.

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