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Is Canada’s immigration ministry purposely refusing visas to French-speaking African students?

By France24
19 July 2022   |   1:55 pm
Although Ottawa defends itself, the Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration found that Canada’s immigration process could be ridden with bias and racial prejudice. In 2021, the rejection rate for visas for French-speaking African students was close to 70%. A processing software used by the ministry called Chinook was also targeted by the group. Several organisations and immigration advocates are calling out the processes in place, which they say lead to systemic racism.

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