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Netflix re-edits scenes in hit show “Squid Game”

By Guardian Exclusive
13 October 2021   |   6:36 pm
Netflix is set to edit its new original series, Squid Games after a South Korean woman complained of getting phone calls and texts from fans of the show. Some of them believe it was intentionally included in the Netflix series. However, producers have made it extremely clear that's not what happened.⁣⁣ ⁣⁣

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