Saturday, 13th August 2022
<To guardian.ng
Search

How Thomas Sankara shaped Burkina Faso 34 years after assassination

By Guardian Exclusive
15 October 2021   |   5:59 pm
Exactly 34 years ago today, the charismatic Pan-Africanist and Burkina Faso's then President, Thomas Sankara, was shot dead aged 37 by soldiers during a coup on 15 October 1987. Four years before his assassination with 12 others, Sankara and his close friend, Blaise Compaoré, staged a coup that brought them to power. This is the story of how he shaped Burkina Faso decades after his assassination.

Related

12 Jun
A massive fire that ripped through a container depot in Sitakunda in Bangladesh has killed at least 38 people. The cause of the blaze remains unclear.
13 Jun
March 17, 1992: This date will forever be remembered in South Africa as the day when whites voted to end the apartheid system that privileged them and oppressed others. The country has seen momentous change since then — but is still wracked by injustice and poverty.
11 Jun
The US House committee presented new findings tying former President Donald Trump to the attack on the Capitol.
17 Jun
After choosing between the familiar faces on offer in April's presidential vote, the French legislative election campaign that followed seemed to many like a seven-week snoozefest. That was until Sunday night. Now, with the first round's ballots counted, Emmanuel Macron has just one week to convince voters to return a centrist majority to parliament for his second term as president. We break down the odds for next week's run-offs.
15 Jun
A violent insurgency has been ravaging Burkina Faso for almost seven years. The government of Burkina Faso revealed on Tuesday that soldiers had recovered the bodies of 79 victims killed in an attack in the northern province of Seno over the weekend.
17 Jun
Joe Biden is set to travel to Israel on July 13 before heading to the occupied West Bank and Saudi Arabia. The trip's announcement comes despite pledges to side-line the "pariah" Saudi state.
17 Jun
Burkina Faso's leader, Lieutenant Colonel Paul-Henri Damiba traveled to Seytenga on Wenesday to visit people who survived an attack that reportedly killed over 100 people over the weekend. Soldiers have recovered 79 bodies so far after the attack in the northern Seno province, the government said on Tuesday, as new details of the assault emerged.
16 Jun
We look at press reactions to the White House announcing President Joe Biden's upcoming trip to Saudi Arabia. British papers react after the government's plan to send illegal migrants to Rwanda to be processed was scuppered by the European Court of Human Rights. Also, K-Pop band BTS announces they are taking a break, much to the dismay of their millions of fans. Finally, Crocs has come up with a new summer collaboration: margarita-inspired Crocs!
20 Jun
The world "missed a historic chance for a clean energy recovery", warns the sustainable energy network REN21. Despite growing investment, clean energy still lags behind fossil fuels when it comes to powering homes and businesses. FRANCE 24's Kate Moody talks to REN21's Executive Director Rana Adib.
22 Jun
Hundreds demonstrated in Tunis on Sunday (June 19) in a second day of protest against a constitutional referendum called by President Kais Saied that his opponents say would cement his hold on power. The demonstration was organized by the Salvation Front, a coalition including the moderate Islamist Ennahda, the largest party in a parliament that Saied dissolved in March.
25 Jun
Ukraine is facing the challenge of demining territory invaded by Russia. Now it will receive help from the Colombian military, which built its expertise fighting guerilla groups. DW's Johan Ramirez met soldiers who will lend Ukraine their know-how.
21 Jun
Marcos Jr. has given himself the position of secretary of agriculture ahead of taking his presidential office and amid prohibitively high global prices. The Philippines is heavily reliant on importing its staple — rice.