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Zouglou artists Yoda and Siro call out President Ouattara in latest album

By France24
25 July 2020   |   11:38 am
In this edition: Ivorian legends of the Zouglou genre kick up a storm with their latest album. Yode and Siro take a pop at President Alassane Ouattara during a tense election year. We also take you to Rwanda where the Amasunzu, a traditional hairstyle once worn by men and unmarried women, is increasingly being sported by contemporary young people. And we head to Morocco to learn about the Spinosaurus, one of the oddest dinosaurs ever discovered. According to researchers, the bones of the first known swimming predator change our understanding of how and where giants of its time lived.

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