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‘It’s not true that we’re a quiet people’: Singer-songwriter Elisapie on defending Inuit culture

By France24
14 December 2018   |   11:00 am
'It's not true that we're a quiet people': Singer-songwriter Elisapie on defending Inuit culture.

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