Saturday, 26th November 2022
<To guardian.ng
Search

How viable is Nigeria’s art industry?

By CNBC
01 October 2018   |   10:11 am
A large economy, a steady consumer-base from a booming and young population, are some of Nigeria's investment attractions. To what extent is Nigeria's Art Industry benefiting from these wins and is the industry harnessing its export potential? Bolaji Alausa, Executive Creative Director at Noah’s Ark joins CNBC Africa to discuss these.

Related

26 Feb
This woman knows her power: Agnes Kifaluka is a Tanzanian martial art actress. She works hard to make her dream become a reality. But she knows: a healthy work-life balance is just as important in life.
27 Feb
Nigerians celebrated the homecoming of Benin bronzes pillaged during the colonial era. It comes as African leaders are pushing for the restitution of the artifacts from Europe.
10 Apr
Kendell Geers and Tsoku Maela are two South African artists taking part in 1-54, the leading international art fair dedicated to contemporary art from Africa and the African diaspora, which is currently on show in Paris. The artists speak to Eve Jackson about their work, which addresses mental health issues in African communities, apartheid and global economic concerns. They also discuss the monolith label of "African art" and how more needs to be done for the restitution of stolen African treasures.
11 Apr
Artist Akingbade Adeniyi uses skewers and toothpicks as a mouthpiece to inform and inspire others living with dyslexia
23 Apr
A Nigerian exhibition, "Art In Autism", is showcasing work from teenagers with autism to raise awareness of the condition in a country where diagnosed children are often shunned and kept behind closed doors.
25 Apr
The textile industry is the backbone of Pakistan's economy, accounting for 8.5 percent of its GDP. But it's also a source of major pollution, with untreated waste flowing into the groundwater and factories relying heavily on coal. Our correspondents report on the industry's impact in Faisalabad, Pakistan's main textile hub, where clothes are produced for the biggest fast fashion brands.
29 Apr
The Democratic Republic of Congo is home to a vibrant, and diverse, arts scene from contemporary creations to performance to dance. The DRC's more established artists are represented at festivals and exhibitions worldwide, but at home, they lack support or protection. We meet artists in Kinshasa to discuss the future of Congo's art scene.
8 May
Kenya-based Yvonne Waiyaki uses art as therapy for deaf children. With support and proper follow-up, they are integrated in the community and can achieve as much as their hearing peers.
6 May
Romania's capital is buried in smoke from burned trash that comes from all over Europe. The dubious business is being investigated. Prosecutors and activists are sounding the alarm about organized crime structures.
14 May
The 9th edition of FIMO, Togo's international fashion festival, didn’t open with a series of fashion shows, but instead with a science symposium organised by the University of Lomé. The theme of the discussion: how to pursue ethical fashion production while Africa continues to be the recipient of thousands of tonnes of the rest of the world’s unsold merchandise? And how to make the most of the rich pool of African design talent? We get some insightful answers from designers, fashion students and academics.
14 May
If you have been a constant follower of the Nigerian music industry, you would have noticed a constant bitter battle involving artists and record labels. Entertainment lawyer, Akinyemi Ayinoluwa talks to GuardianTV about the issues and how they can be solved. 
24 May
As the international art world flocks to Dakar for its much-anticipated Biennale, Senegalese artist Fally Sene Sow just has to look out the window to find inspiration in the colourful and chaotic market street outside his studio in the capital.