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daughters

3 Sep
In Peru, 60 percent of people who disappear are women. Over 11,000 women were reported missing in the country last year, the majority of them teenagers. Some disappearances are voluntary. But most are linked to human trafficking networks, prostitution and domestic violence. Despite this poor record, Peru was the first nation in South America to recognise forced disappearances as gender-based violence.
19 Mar 2023
With the Taliban banning girls from secondary schools and universities, we meet the Afghan families who risked everything by fleeing to neighbouring Pakistan to ensure their daughters receive an education. We also visit the Kenyan village which bans men as it offers a refuge to women and girls facing gender-based violence.

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The 77 Percent takes a closer look at the African politicians who change the rules to cling to power. As Gambia prepares for elections, tensions are rising among young people on both sides of the political divide.
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At the age of 15, Leonora Messing secretly left her home in Saxony-Anhalt. She’d planned her journey down to the last detail, traveling via Turkey to Syria. She had her heart set on marrying an IS fighter — a man she had never even met before.
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The International Women's Film Festival features 18 films, all made by women. The auditorium of the only cinema in Benin's capital, Cotonou, is filled to capacity. Anyone who arrives late has to sit on the floor.
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As tensions escalate in the Gaza Strip, many displaced Palestinians are now gripped with fear about Israeli forces launching a relentless assault on the city of Rafah.
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In an interview with FRANCE 24, NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg said he expected that "regardless of the outcome of the US elections", Washington "will continue to be a committed NATO ally".
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Doctors in the U.S. are struggling to contend with burnout, staffing shortages and overwhelming administrative workloads, according to a new survey. Despite these challenges, 83% of doctors in the survey said they believe AI could eventually help. More than 1,000 doctors were surveyed between Oct. 23 and Nov. 8 in the study, commissioned by Athenahealth.