Tuesday, 16th August 2022
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Women’s skateboarding on the rise in Brazil after Tokyo Olympics

The skateboarding tricks that made Rayssa Leal the youngest Olympic medalist in Brazil's history push girls from early childhood to teenagers onto the country's slopes, where until recently they were the exception.

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21 May
An entrepreneurship association made up mostly of young women from South Kivu in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, is manufacturing soap from coffee beans. The group’s coordinator, Mademoiselle Solange Kwinja, says the product is a great success since it is now being marketed in Bukavu, the provincial capital.
23 May
The Taliban has made face veils mandatory for all Afghan women appearing in public, including those on television. This edict was ignored by presenters on Saturday, but they relented a day later.
5 Jun
Many women in Angola’s province of Bengo are now achieving places often occupied by men. For example: arbitration. Young female referees show the importance of cooperating with each other – no matter who, no matter where.
30 May
Many women in Angola’s province of Bengo are now achieving places often occupied by men. For example: arbitration. Young female referees show the importance of cooperating with each other – no matter who, no matter where.
11 Jun
Kabare prison is notorious for deaths in custody caused by hunger. Now, women are changing it with a food project.
5 Jun
The catastrophic weather has forced dozens to flee their homes in Brazil's northeastern Pernambuco state. A red alert has been issued in the city of Recife for Sunday as well.
4 Jun
Afghanistan is heading back to the pre-2001 dark days of the Taliban, and Western powers were naive if they ever thought this wouldn't be the case. That's the view of Heather Barr, associate women's rights director at Human Rights Watch. As women are told to cover their faces in public again and female television presenters are told to do the same, she spoke to us on Perspective about the how the Taliban are rolling back women's rights and what, if anything, the West can do about it. "Life has become a prison for most women and girls," she told us.
7 Jun
After studying philosophy, Brazilian national Pedro Cesarino grew tired of Western systems of knowledge and decided to study other ways of thinking and living. He is now a renowned anthropologist and has published articles and books based on his field research with the Amazon's Marubo community. His first novel tells the story of a melancholy anthropologist hoping to track down a myth in the Amazon rainforest. It explores the certainty with which many anthropologists approach the communities they study and the resulting misunderstandings. He joined us for Perspective.
12 Jun
The American and Brazilian presidents spoke on the sidelines of the Americas Summit, with Jair Bolsonaro trying to breathe life into his re-election campaign and Joe Biden keen to have something to show for his event.
13 Jun
In what is set to be a landmark agreement for gender equality, the EU is to vote on legislation where companies will face mandatory quotas to ensure women have at least 40 percent of seats on corporate boards. Annette Young talks to Carlien Scheele from the European Institute for Gender Studies on what it means for businesses across the European bloc. Also as the Taliban continues to ban schooling for girls aged over 11, we meet the Afghan people risking all to ensure girls receive an education. Plus the story of Viola Smith, the first female professional jazz drummer who fought for greater recognition of women in the industry.
17 Jun
Brazilian rescue teams have found a backpack and clothes belonging to British journalist Dom Phillips and tribal expert Bruno Pereira respectively. Their mission to find the missing men continues.
19 Jun
The remains of UK journalist Dom Phillips and indigenous expert Bruno Pereira have been found in the Amazon jungle, according to a report. However, federal police deny that the bodies had been found and identified.