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A hundred Thai elephants take part in battle reenactment

By AFP
19 November 2019   |   8:34 am
A hundred elephants take part in the Surin elephant round-up where mahouts, the elephant handlers, show their skills in battle re-enactments and playing football. Elephants have to endure traumatic and painful training in order to be tamed.

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