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Why Nepalese migrant workers continue to flock to the Gulf

By France24
21 November 2022   |   10:30 am
Despite the risks and potential for exploitation, Middle Eastern countries continue to attract hundreds of thousands of Nepali migrant labor every year. Last year alone, over 620,000 Nepali workers moved to the region. That's because these jobs often offer higher pay than jobs in Nepal.

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