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Turkey demands to know who ordered “savage” Khashoggi killing

By Reuters
29 October 2018   |   12:19 pm
Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan on Tuesday (October 23) dismissed attempts by Riyadh to blame Jamal Khashoggi's "savage" killing on rogue operatives, saying the person who ordered the death of the prominent Saudi journalist must "be brought to account".

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