Wednesday, 25th May 2022
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Tibetans demand China reveal fate of boy taken away in 1995

The boy, chosen as “Panchen Lama” was taken away by Chinese authorities for questioning in 1995. He has not been seen since then. China had appointed another boy as the Panchen Lama.

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