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Threat of Russian invasion of Ukraine sparks global market sell-off

By France24
15 February 2022   |   8:26 am
Fears that a Russian invasion of Ukraine could be imminent have sent jitters across global stock markets. In Europe, Paris's CAC 40 and Germany's DAX both fell more than 3 percent at midday. Russia's main stock market also saw a sharp decline, adding to last week's sell-off. Plus, after two years grappling with changes to their careers, a growing number of people in France are turning to the real estate sector to start a completely new job.

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With 100,000 troops amassed on its border with Ukraine, Russia is at a glaring advantage should a conflict arise. But Ukrainians from all walks of life are preparing for the worst, ready to step in at a moment's notice. DW's Mathias Bölinger reports.
19 Jan
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Germany has declined to join allies such as the US and UK in shipping weapons to Ukraine. The country faces an unpredictable buildup of Russian troops on its borders — and there is precedent for armed aggression.
25 Jan
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30 Jan
It's been a rollercoaster 24 hours on global stock markets, with huge swings on Wall Street and volatility hitting its highest level since October 2020. Investors are waiting for the decision from the US Federal Reserve on when it will start raising interest rates, but are also concerned about the rising tensions at Ukraine's border. Meanwhile, Bitcoin has slumped as low as $33,000, down over 50 percent from its peak in November. Our Business Editor Stephen Carroll has the details.
26 Jan
The West still doesn't know why war in Ukraine might happen, but it increasingly seems like it's happening. Kiev is trying to keep calm and rally support while being surrounded on three sides and being the recent victim of a cyberattack that feels like a dry run. Meanwhile, NATO countries are sending weapons and advisors while deploying fresh troops elsewhere in Eastern Europe. But that's small compared to the 100,000-plus forces amassed by Moscow.
29 Jan
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27 Jan
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6 Feb
With Russia massing 100,000 combat-ready troops just across Ukraine's eastern border, many fear an invasion is imminent. DW's Nick Connolly traveled to Ukraine's war-torn Donbass region and talked to residents and soldiers who live on the front line.
5 Feb
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