Sunday, 16th January 2022
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The psychology behind climate inaction: How to beat the ‘doom barrier’

Despite the urgency of a 'climate emergency' we're nowhere near fulfilling the Paris agreement. Why are we so reluctant to act? Climate psychologist Per Espen Stoknes says we need to move away from pointing blame.

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14 Nov
At Thoiry park, in the Yvelines region outside Paris, there are many surprises in store. Thoiry is not a typical zoo, since the animals live in semi-freedom. The safari is the main attraction. Visitors get around in their own cars or on board a so-called bush truck to discover 180 different species of animals up close, including lions and elephants. FRANCE 24 takes you behind the scenes of the park, which attracts half a million visitors a year.
13 Nov
Here in northern Europe we've had some very odd weather events in the last few months, including torrential rainfall and deadly floods – which scientists say are a direct consequence of climate change. It's something to focus the mind as leaders and negotiators meet in Glasgow at the United Nations climate summit known as COP26.
14 Nov
Stories of courage, specifically about women, are the theme of a special festival organised this weekend by Amnesty International in Paris. For three days, the curtain will go up on the 12th Cinema and Human Rights Festival. The event invites moviegoers and activists to watch a series of short and longer films and then debate their content. In Perspective, we spoke to coordinator Ievgeniia Sokova.
14 Nov
The French press discusses the new Covid-19 rules and policy changes in President Emmanuel Macron's address to the nation. We also see how French papers are covering the Paris visit of US Vice President Kamala Harris. Finally, the British and Pakistani press are celebrating Malala's happy news.
11 Nov
Rich nations pledged more than a decade ago to pay $100 billion a year by 2020 to help developing countries cut their own emissions and reduce the already-felt impacts of climate change.
20 Nov
At COP26, richer countries are told to pull their head out of the sand and deliver on climate change promises. Africa is paying dearly for the environmentally destructive policies of developed nations. Also, Covid-19 has kept the border between DR Congo and the Republic of Congo closed for a year and a half. The impact on trade has left communities struggling. And more than a century after they were looted by French colonisers, dozens of artefacts are finally back home in Benin.
15 Nov
African voices are at the heart of conversations at the COP26 climate summit. Despite contributing the least to greenhouse gas emissions, the continent is on the frontline of changes that threaten the environment and livelihoods. In Mauritius, there are fears all the country's beaches could be gone in just 50 years. Meanwhile, the Rwandan capital Kigali is being transformed into a green city with a pedestrian-only centre and self-service bikes.
13 Nov
Former Danone CEO Emmanuel Faber has just attended the COP26 climate summit in Glasgow. Now a partner at the impact investor Astanor Ventures, he has long called for the private sector to play a greater role in the fight against climate change. "No one has stepped up enough at this stage. But people and companies are moving," he told FRANCE 24's Kate Moody.
17 Nov
Climate negotiations at COP26 are running into overtime in Glasgow. A fresh draft deal urges a speedy transition from coal and fossil fuel subsidies, but it needs to be agreed by nearly 200 countries.
16 Nov
Germany's chancellor-in-waiting, Olaf Scholz, has met two climate activists who staged a hunger strike to demand more radical climate policies. The pair ended their action after a preelection promise from Scholz.
16 Nov
The UN climate summit has been slammed as a failure after India and China weakened language on phasing out fossil fuels and historical polluters refused to accept liability for damage caused by extreme weather.
24 Nov
What does climate change have to do with income inequality, racism or intergenerational justice? A lot! See why the culprits of global warming in rich countries are less affected than those in poorer countries.