Wednesday, 8th February 2023
<To guardian.ng
Search

Sanctioned for drugs, Venezuelan vice president slams U.S. ‘aggression’

By Reuters
15 February 2017   |   4:00 am
Venezuela's powerful vice president on Tuesday called his blacklisting by the United States on drug charges an "imperialist aggression" in the first flare-up between the two countries under new U.S. President Trump.

Related

26 Aug 2021
Rodrigo Duterte is the ruling political party's vice-presidential nominee for next year's election. Critics say it's an attempt by the strongman to hold on to power after his presidential term ends.
25 Aug 2021
Vice President Kamala Harris says the US will find new ways to "raise the pressure on Beijing", accusing China of bullying in the hotly disputed Asian waters for the second time in two days. China claims almost all of the resource-rich South China Sea, through which trillions of dollars in shipping trade passes annually, with competing claims from four Southeast Asian states including Vietnam. Harris made the comments on a visit to Vietnam to stress US commitment to Asia, a trip critics have slammed as tone-deaf given the parallels with the superpower's evacuations from Saigon and Kabul.
4 Sep 2021
With a new type of simple blood test, Elizabeth Holmes wanted to revolutionize the health care industry. Her company Theranos was a Wall Street darling until it was exposed as a fraud. Now she is on trial in California.
7 Sep 2021
Venezuela's government and opposition agreed on some key points during the negotiations in Mexico. But there is still "a long way to go," according to the leader of President Nicolas Maduro's team.
22 Sep 2021
Mexico is presenting itself as the new champion of Latin American integration. To do that, it appears willing to embrace the continent's isolated autocratic leftist leaders. But it's a risky move.
23 Sep 2021
Emmanuel Macron and Joe Biden have agreed that "open consultations" could have prevented the diplomatic row between Paris and Washington over a nuclear submarine deal.
4 Oct 2021
For the third time in 13 years, Venezuela has slashed zeroes off its inflation-battered currency, the bolivar. This time, it will shed six zeroes, for a total of 14 since 2008. With that, a million bolivars have overnight become one -- still the equivalent of about 25 US dollar cents. Venezuela's central bank announced the move last month to simplify transactions, with consumers scrambling to make payment for even the most basic goods or services. According to private sector estimates around two thirds of transactions in the country now happen in US dollars. Old banknotes now worth almost nothing have become children’s toys or lie discarded in streets around the country. The once-rich oil producer is battling its eighth year of recession and hyperinflation that reached nearly 3,000 percent in 2020 and more than 9,500 percent the year before, according to central bank figures.
6 Oct 2021
Congo Mirador was once an idyllic spot: a community of homes on stilts that seemed to float on the calm waters of a lagoon in western Venezuela. Now, the community is inundated with mud, a victim of silt generated by the Catatumbo river.
20 Nov 2021
Thousands of musicians are hoping to have set a record by performing as part of the world’s largest orchestra.
23 Feb 2022
An oil producer hard hit by the slump in global prices, Venezuela has seen its economy gradually deteriorate over the past decade, with international economic sanctions aggravating the crisis.
11 Mar 2022
Venezuela is cutting six zeroes off the value of its currency, the bolivar. That's as its banknotes have become increasingly worthless due to runaway inflation.
3 Apr 2022
The war in Ukraine has moved Poland from the fringes of US foreign policy into the spotlight. At the same time, Washington has become even more indispensable for Warsaw as a guarantor of security.