Wednesday, 5th October 2022
<To guardian.ng
Search

‘Pretty fly on a white guy’: Insect steals buzz at VP debate

By Abiodun Ogundairo
10 October 2020   |   4:12 pm
We look at reactions to the vice presidential debate, in which Mike Pence repeatedly interrupted Kamala Harris and was ultimately upstaged by a fly that landed in his hair. French papers examine the debate over a new law that would lengthen the amount of time women have to seek abortions. Plus: Alaska crowns its fattest bear and the Guardian warns straight women not to trust deep-voiced men.

Related

11 May 2019
The insect population in Germany has dropped drastically, which could affect plant diversity and food production. The WWF reports that Germany is one of the most vulnerable locations in Europe for loss of biodiversity.
15 Aug 2019
Bees, butterflies and other pollinators are threatened around the world. One project is encouraging farmers in Morocco to use blooming fields and insect hotels to protect them.
4 Sep 2019
Tasting grilled scorpion and a bowl of crunchy insects mixed with garlic and spices on a trip to Thailand four years ago "grossed out" chef Mario Barnard but also helped inspire him to experiment and open South Africa's first pop-up restaurant serving insect-only meals.
3 Nov 2019
Insects are among the most successful creatures on the planet. But they're in decline and that would have serious consequences for the world. Entomologist Josef Settele talks to DW about stopping the insect die-out.
10 Oct 2020
We look at reactions to the vice presidential debate, in which Mike Pence repeatedly interrupted Kamala Harris and was ultimately upstaged by a fly that landed in his hair. French papers examine the debate over a new law that would lengthen the amount of time women have to seek abortions. Plus: Alaska crowns its fattest bear and the Guardian warns straight women not to trust deep-voiced men.
13 Jun 2021
The scenic region of Mount Lebanon has long produced pine seed, a regional delicacy, but harvests have collapsed amid an exotic insect infestation experts say is accelerated by climate change.