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Over 4 million Germans sought work in 2019

By Abiodun Ogundairo
12 October 2020   |   9:00 am
Some 4.4 million people in Germany were looking for a job or additional work in 2019, statistics show. That's less than 2018, but observers fear coronavirus pandemic-related job losses will see unemployment rise in 2020.

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