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Outgoing Lebanese PM Hariri arrives in Paris amidst political uncertainty at home

By DW
18 November 2017   |   11:07 am
Lebanon's Saad al-Hariri arrived in Paris on Saturday where he is due to hold talks with the French President Emmanuel Macron. Hariri resigned as Lebanese prime minister earlier this month, plunging Lebanon into political crisis.

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