Saturday, 26th November 2022
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Nuclear risk: How does Zaporizhzhia compare with Chernobyl?

Although it's impossible to say for sure what consequences an accident at a nuclear power plant might have on human health in the environment nearby, experts can make some predictions.

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30 Apr 2018
Wildlife is moving to villages that were abandoned after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in 1986. Over the past 30 years, nature has been reclaiming the 30km zone around the former nuclear power plant.
4 Aug 2019
In the course of filming in Pripyat, DW reporters learned that the Ukrainian national guard holds target practice in the radioactively contaminated city. Why there, and how dangerous is it?
8 Apr 2020
Emergency units are trying to contain fires in radiation-contaminated forest near the abandoned Chernobyl nuclear plant. The fires have caused a spike in radioactivity in the area.
19 Apr 2020
Firefighters worked for 10 days to extinguish fires that broke out in the forest around the Chernobyl nuclear plant. Ukrainian officials say they've tracked down two men who are believed to be behind the blazes.
3 Nov 2020
Boston Dynamics robotic dog known as 'Spot' designed to detect radiation, was spotted working at Chernobyl’s nuclear reactor number four, as the State Agency of Ukraine on Exclusion Zone Management reported on October 23.
24 Apr 2021
Down an overgrown country road, three startled wild horses with rugged coats and rigid manes dart into the flourishing overgrowth of their unlikely nature reserve: the Chernobyl exclusion zone.
10 Mar
The decommissioned Chernobyl nuclear site has been knocked off Ukraine's power grid. Operations such as water cooling to manage the heat of spent fuel at the site still require power.
6 Apr
This week, we start with some good news. Radiation levels are "quite normal" around Chernobyl. The head of the UN's nuclear watchdog confirms that Russian forces have pulled back from the site of Europe's worst-ever nuclear disaster. The IAEA is working with both sides to avoid Chernobyl again becoming a frontline in the war in Ukraine.
4 Jul
On February 24, the first day of Russia's war in Ukraine, Moscow's troops took over Chernobyl, the scene of the world's worst ever nuclear accident. Following a 35-day occupation, Ukraine regained control of the defunct plant but workers have had a hard time returning it to regular functioning. Employees were forced to rebuild IT systems from scratch after specialist equipment and software was ransacked by Russian soldiers. Chernobyl remains a highly volatile site, with hundreds of tonnes of radioactive material still sitting under a protective cover.
13 Aug
Among the dangers posed by the war in Ukraine is the risk of a nuclear catastrophe at Europe's largest nuclear plant, which is now under Russian control — in a war zone. The director general of the International Atomic Energy Agency, Rafael Grossi, spoke to DW about his concerns over the situation at the Zaporizhzhia plant.
13 Aug
Moscow will not give Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant back to Ukraine despite the G7 demand, Russian officials have said. Kyiv urged the UN and the Red Cross to visit Russian POW camps. Follow DW for the latest.
23 Aug
Ukraine's state nuclear company says it believes Russia will carry out a major "provocation" at the Zaporizhzhia plant. The UN chief has visited Ukraine's port of Odesa.