Wednesday, 17th August 2022
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How serious is North Korea’s food crisis?

The country is experiencing chronic food-insecurity problems so severe that its leader, Kim Jong Un, last year drew a comparison to a famine in the 1990s that killed at least 200,000 and perhaps as many as 3m people. By the regime's own admission, this year's drought is the second-worst since records began in 1981.

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