Wednesday, 25th May 2022
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How serious are the Taliban about full education for girls?

The Taliban has said they want to allow girls to continue attending school. That does not mean, however, an education in the Western sense of the word.

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18 Dec
Around 5,000 people every day are crossing the border from Afghanistan into Iran. While Tehran is deporting thousands every week, many are still setting out on the perilous journey that often begins in the city of Herat.
13 Dec
The assault on police officers guarding a polio vaccination team took place a day after the militants had called an end to their truce with the Pakistani government.
14 Dec
More Afghans facing extreme poverty are turning to opium production as a means of survival. Despite promises to the contrary, the Taliban are unlikely to oppose cultivation of the narcotic cash crop.
17 Dec
It's been four months since the Taliban swept to power in Afghanistan, something they did faster than anyone anticipated. Since August, they have had to make a rapid transition to running the day-to-day business of a struggling state. From Kabul to the Taliban stronghold of Kandahar and the mountainous Wardak province, our team have witnessed the grim reality of Taliban rule. FRANCE 24's senior reporters Catherine Norris Trent and Roméo Langlois bring us this exclusive full-length documentary.
17 Dec
What's it really like inside the new Afghanistan? Four months after the fall of Kabul to the Taliban, FRANCE 24 went to the capital and beyond to speak to citizens from all walks of life. What they heard was a mix: relief that the guns have gone quiet but worry over the prospect of a bleak winter, with more than half the population facing acute food shortages. Meanwhile, Afghanistan remains isolated on the world stage and its new rulers have yet to let women return to school and work. The Taliban also still have to prove that they can run a country.
27 Dec
Nearly 10 billion dollars of Afghanistan's reserves, held in the United States, remain out of reach for the Taliban because the White House won't release the money. Meanwhile, half of Afghanistan's population is facing hunger.
27 Dec
Taliban authorities in Afghanistan on Sunday gave new guidance to taxi drivers, advising them against taking fares from women who do not follow a strict Islamic dress code by wearing the hijab, or Islamic headscarf.
3 Jan
Initial restrictions imposed by the Taliban after their takeover mostly targeted urban women. Now, the expanded rules could affect all women in Afghanistan.
14 Jan
Thousands of journalists have lost their jobs in Afghanistan over the past few months, with many media outlets ceasing operations due to increasing security and financial challenges.
11 Jan
Thousands of journalists have lost their jobs in Afghanistan over the past few months as many media outlets ceased operations due to increasing security and financial challenges.
15 Jan
Professor Faizullah Jalal has openly criticized the Taliban since the group took over Afghanistan last year. However, his family disputed the posts which the Taliban claim he made on social media.
13 Jan
Afghanistan is the world's top producer of opium and the illegal drug trade has helped finance the ruling Taliban. Over the past decades, millions of Afghans have fallen into drug addiction. The Taliban now claim they want to eradicate the use of narcotics. When they were in power from 1996 to 2001, the fundamentalists had banned poppy cultivation. But the intervention of US-led troops in 2001 relaunched opium production. Today, it remains permitted and is even intensifying in a country on the brink of economic collapse. Our team on the ground reports.