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German foreign minister visits Turkey, Afghanistan’s neighbors

By DW
01 September 2021   |   11:01 am
Over the next four days, German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas will head to five countries — all of which have a role to play in the effort to get those in need of protection out of Afghanistan.

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