Wednesday, 5th October 2022
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German Catholic cardinal abandons medal over church abuse legacy

Cardinal Reinhard Marx's decision to waive one of Germany's highest honors is a sign that "church aristocracy" is finally glancing at past harm done, say sexual abuse victims.

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