Wednesday, 30th November 2022
<To guardian.ng
Search

France’s cultural industry eager to bounce back after lockdown

By France24
30 May 2020   |   7:01 am
In France, the month of May is usually synonymous with the Cannes Film Festival. But this year, the world's biggest movie extravaganza did not take place due to the coronavirus pandemic. Whether it's cinema, theatre or music, all branches of France's prized cultural sector have taken a hit from the lockdown and it's unclear when things will improve. Facing harsh criticism from the artistic world, the French government recently unveiled a rescue plan. Will it be enough to save the country's prized cultural industry? Join us for this episode of French Connections.

Related

8 Jun
First it was a stadium fiasco, then a blame game. Now will political football lead to sackings? French senators are questioning Emmanuel Macron's interior minister after the tear-gassing of Liverpool fans shut out of last Saturday's Champions League final, as well as the claim that up to 40,000 English supporters showed up with forged tickets or no tickets.
8 Jun
Ukraine's national team aimed for a happy ending to their inspiring World Cup quest. But despite coming up short in Wales, the match still provided welcome distraction at home.
8 Jun
The agency has warned of the risk of 1970s-style stagflation persisting in the coming years amid soaring commodity prices and low growth. Developing countries are expected to be some of the worst hit.
9 Jun
This week, we explore the upcoming French legislative elections, the so-called "third round" of the presidential race. This time, French voters are electing 577 MPs to the Assemblée nationale, the lower house of parliament. Though arguably just as important as the race for the Élysée Palace, turnout tends to be lower. So do these elections work? We tell you more in this edition of French Connections.
11 Jun
Disney's upcoming animated adventure film "Strange World" will go straight to Disney+ in France, while it will debut on the big screen elsewhere. The entertainment giant is protesting against the country's strict rules that require theatrically-released films to wait 17 months before going to streaming platforms. But first, European lawmakers take a step closer to meeting the bloc's target of making all new cars emissions-free by 2035, by endorsing a proposed ban on new fuel-powered cars.
14 Jun
Pablo Picasso's problematic relationship with the opposite sex has long been documented: by the women who shared his life and by the art critics and biographers who relayed the artist's musings, such as "there are only two kinds of women: goddesses and doormats". As the Picasso Museum in Paris invites feminist artist ORLAN to revisit his portraits in "Weeping Women Are Angry", we speak to art critic and author Judith Benhamou. She tells us why "like many geniuses, Picasso was a monster" and how his sexual appetite fuelled his creative impulses.
13 Jun
Emmanuel Macron's alliance is in a tight race with the new left-wing union NUPES according to initial projections. Macron is predicted to win a greater number of districts which could grant him a parliamentary majority.
12 Jun
A new left-wing coalition wants to win a majority in France's upcoming legislative elections and challenge Emmanuel Macron's hold on parliamentary power. Their chances are slim but not impossible.
18 Jun
More than 20 years ago, a community of men and women in the French region of Burgundy set themselves a massive challenge: to build a castle using the techniques of the Middle Ages. The site in the town of Guédelon is open to visitors, offering them an immersion into the 13th century. Today, nearly 40 people work every day on this medieval construction site. Stone quarrying is the first step in building a castle. And to transport the stones to the site, modern machines are banned: everything is done like in the 13th century, with horsepower.
15 Jun
Despite government promises of a green COVID recovery, a new report says the world missed a "historic chance" to boost clean energy.
18 Jun
We take a look at how the press is covering the French, German and Italian leaders' visit to Kyiv. Meanwhile, French papers are largely divided over the country's upcoming legislative elections on Sunday. Also, Thailand gets closer to same-sex marriage legislation, while Saudi Arabia confiscates rainbow-coloured toys. Finally, the Washington Post debates whether QR code menus in restaurants should stay or go.
18 Jun
Executives at France's state-backed utility EDF say they're confident the troubled nuclear reactor at their Flamanville plant will be able to go online by the end of 2023. Under construction since 2007, the new EPR project has been plagued by cost overruns and repeated delays. We take a closer look. Plus, on the sidelines of the VivaTech trade fair in Paris, India's IT minister tells FRANCE 24 how the country is looking to bring its technology to Europe and beyond.