Wednesday, 25th May 2022
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Fleeing Russia’s invasion, Ukrainians hit a wall at UK

As countries open borders to Ukrainians, Britain's policies, which are largely limited to family reunification, seem stingy in comparison. Through Monday, Britain had only issued about 50 visas for displaced Ukrainians.

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Kyiv held out overnight against Russian attacks and bombing as fighting intensified in other cities. DW has an overview as the Russian war on Ukraine rages on.
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The front pages continue their focus on Vladimir Putin's bloody offensive in Ukraine. We also look at how Poland is enjoying positive publicity for a change and hoping to redeem itself in the eyes of the EU after years of strained ties. Finally, we see how supermarkets are calling for an iconic British dish – chicken Kiev – to be renamed chicken Kyiv in honour of its Ukrainian spelling.
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The invasion of Ukraine by the Russian military has spurred Europe’s worst security crisis in decades. But while most analyses are currently looking at how the war will end, here are most likely easy immediate ways to solve the situation.