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Egypt’s revolution 10 years on: What happened to “bread, freedom & social justice”?

By France24
30 January 2021   |   7:00 am
Ten years on, we are examining the revolution that changed Egypt. The Arab Spring swept through North Africa and the Middle East and with it some hardline leaders were swept aside. Today is the annual day of the police in Egypt, President Abel Fattah al Sissi presided over commemorations of the role of Egyptian lawenforcement. A role that many activists say was at best heavy-handed back in 2011, and has continued it the same way. The scene a decade ago was so very different.

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