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Egypt, 10 years on: From revolution to counter-revolution

By Abiodun Ogundairo
03 March 2021   |   11:00 am
On February 11, 2011, after almost three decades in power, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak resigned following 18 days of mass protests. But 10 years later, the ideals of the revolution have given way to another authoritarian military regime. On the emblematic Tahrir Square, where thousands of protesters once gathered, even taking out a camera is now forbidden. Meanwhile, NGOs estimate that at least 60,000 political prisoners are languishing in Egyptian jails. Our Cairo correspondents Edouard Dropsy and Claire Williot report.

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