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Economic collapse wipes out Afghanistan’s tourism

By DW
15 February 2022   |   10:26 am
Prior to the Taliban takeover in Afghanistan, the country's tourism industry provided much-needed employment for tour guides, boat operators, and other professions. But due to the current economic crisis, all that has dried up.

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