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Decades on, Soviet bombs still killing people in Afghanistan

By AFP
21 December 2019   |   6:21 am
Forty years after the Soviet Union invaded Afghanistan -- and three decades since the conflict ended -- the war's legacy continues to claim lives across the country. A humanitarian organisation has been working in several Afghan provinces since 1999 to clear explosives left from a war most of the country's current, young population never lived through.

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