Thursday, 6th October 2022
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Could sanctions against Putin cripple the global economy?

Putin‘s war on Ukraine is having a devastating economic impact. Countries across Europe face spiralling prices and shrinking markets. Our guests: Katja Gloger (Russia expert), Vendeline von Wedekind (The Economist), Vladimir Esipov (DW)

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Russia's top banks, technology and aerospace industries, and debt markets are targeted by the United States, Britain and the European Union in response to the invastion of Ukraine. But the West remains divided on excluding Russia from the SWIFT interbank transfer system.
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6 Mar
The US, EU and their allies have been announcing measures designed to isolate and weaken the Russian economy. Since 2014, Vladimir Putin has been taking pre-emptive steps to protect the economy from future sanctions. But Brian O'Toole, a former US Treasury official and senior fellow at the Atlantic Council, says that in the face of Western sanctions, "Fortress Russia is gone."
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Western sanctions imposed on Russia as a reaction to its invasion of Ukraine are beginning to bite. Everybody is likely to be affected, but some economic sectors will be hit harder than others.
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