Wednesday, 29th June 2022
<To guardian.ng
Search

Australia’s federal election: Climate change becomes top concern for voters

By France24
17 May 2022   |   12:37 pm
Australia is counting down to its next federal election on May 21. The environmental crisis is high on voters' minds and smaller parties and independents are gaining momentum by riding a wave of disillusionment over the conservative coalition's lack of climate action. With a hung parliament looking likely, these minor players could force the traditional parties to do more to tackle global warming. Climate change is an increasingly hot-button issue since the country's devastating bushfires of 2019-20. Our correspondents Richelle Harrison Plesse and Gregory Plesse report.

Related

12 Dec 2021
In the global effort to reduce greenhouse gases, many countries do not include armed forces' emissions in their target. Experts say, the world's militaries are among the biggest polluters on the planet – lagging in developing greener technologies.
14 Dec 2021
Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison and South Korean President Moon Jae-in have signed a defense deal worth 1 billion Australian dollars as the two countries mark 60 years of diplomatic relations.
26 Dec 2021
During the pandemic, Australia closed its borders and stopped most people, from coming in or going out. As a result, COVID-19's impact has been mild there — but people there have had to endure long lockdowns that are only now being lifted.
27 Dec 2021
With days to go until Christmas, Santa might be somewhere out there worrying about how to deliver all the presents with his team of reindeer... meanwhile, just north of the Arctic circle, real reindeers herders are struggling with much bigger problems: climate change threatens their very livelihood.
28 Dec 2021
The 10 most expensive weather disasters of 2021 caused more than $170 billion (€150 billion) in damages, UK charity Christian Aid has reported. That's up $20 billion on last year's figure.
5 Jan
Emmanuel Macron tells Le Parisien he wants to "piss off" the unvaccinated, prompting reaction from papers and rival politicians. Papers also reflect on the upcoming anniversary of the January 6 storming of the US Capitol. There's outrage in the Australian press after Serbian tennis star Novak Djokovic is granted a medical exemption from the Australian Open's vaccine requirements. Plus: we discover two stories of people using billboards to look for love.
14 Jan
Serbian tennis star Novak Djokovic faces deportation once again after Australia's immigration minister used his powers to tear up Djokovic's visa. The player could still dispute the decision in court.
19 Jan
Rafa Nadal is taking no pleasure from the absence of great rival Novak Djokovic at the Australian Open, even if it means he has a clearer shot at the Grand Slam title record.
25 Jan
Anti-vax enthusiasts claim that at least three athletes dropped out of the 2022 Australian Open tournament due to chest problems related to Covid-19 vaccination.We tell you more in this edition of Truth or Fake. Anti-vax enthusiasts claim that at least three athletes dropped out of the 2022 Australian Open tournament due to chest problems related to Covid-19 vaccination.We tell you more in this edition of Truth or Fake.
25 Jan
Australia's vocal criticism of China's human rights record has long angered Beijing. When Canberra called for an investigation into the origin of the coronavirus in 2020, Beijing slapped high tariffs on some Australian products.
18 Feb
In the early 1970s crocodiles were considered almost extinct in northern Australia. Then the country banned hunting them and launched a conservation program that has been proving very successful. Both people and nature benefit.
15 Feb
As climate change continues to take effect, we are all going to have to change the way we behave in order to survive. That's the conclusion of Eric Klinenberg, a professor of social science at New York University who's written a book focusing on the extreme 1995 heatwave in Chicago. Temperatures there hit over 41°C, killing hundreds of people. Klinenberg says it's not just infrastructure that will have to change, but the whole way we interact with our families and those living around us.