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Air travel will take up to three years to recover from Covid-19, IATA chief says

By France24
19 June 2020   |   7:00 am
This will be the worst year in the history of aviation, with passenger numbers and revenues half of what they were last year, according to industry body the International Air Transport Association (IATA). With borders closed to limit the spread of the coronavirus, airlines have been forced to ground their fleets, costing them billions in lost revenue every month. "The worst is behind us," IATA's CEO Alexandre de Juniac told FRANCE 24 - providing that there is no second wave of Covid-19. He warned, however, that it will take until 2022 or 2023 before air travel returns to pre-pandemic levels.

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